jaundice

jaundice (jawn´dis)

A yellowish staining of the integument, sclerae, and deeper tissues and the excretions with bile pigments, which are increased in the plasma.icterus; [Fr. jaune, yellow]
acholuric j. j. with excessive amounts of unconjugated bilirubin in the plasma and without bile pigments in the urine.
anhepatic j. j. due to hemolysis, with normal function of the liver and biliary tract.anhepatogenous j;
anhepatogenous j. anhepatic j
catarrhal j. obsolete term for viral hepatitis type A.
choleric j. j. with the presence of biliary derivatives in the urine; occurs in regurgitation hyperbilirubinemia.
cholestatic j. j. produced by inspissated bile or bile plugs in small biliary passages in the liver.
chronic acholuric j. hereditary spherocytosis
chronic familial j. hereditary spherocytosis
chronic idiopathic j. Dubin-Johnson syndrome
congenital hemolytic j. hereditary spherocytosis
familial nonhemolytic j. [MIM*143500] mild j. due to increased amounts of unconjugated bilirubin in the plasma without evidence of liver damage, biliary obstruction, or hemolysis; thought to be due to an inborn error of metabolism in which the excretion of bilirubin by the liver is defective, ascribed to decreased conjugation of bilirubin as a glucuronide or impaired uptake of hepatic bilirubin.benign familial icterus, constitutional hepatic dysfunction, Gilbert's disease, Gilbert's syndrome, Hebra's disease (2) ;
hematogenous j. hemolytic j
hemolytic j. j. resulting from increased production of bilirubin from hemoglobin as a result of any process (toxic, genetic, or immune) causing increased destruction of erythrocytes.hematogenous j., toxemic j;
hepatocellular j. j. resulting from diffuse injury or inflammation or failure of function of the liver cells, usually referring to viral or toxic hepatitis.
hepatogenous j. j. resulting from disease of the liver, as distinguished from that due to blood changes.
homologous serum j. obsolete term for viral hepatitis type B.
human serum j. obsolete name for hepatitis transmitted parenterally, usually by blood or blood products; usually due to hepatitis B.
infectious j. 1. Weil's disease 2. sometimes used in referring to viral hepatitis type A.
infective j. acute onset of malaise, fever, myalgia, nausea, anorexia, abdominal pain, and icterus caused by members of the genus Leptospira.
leptospiral j. j. associated with infection by various species of Leptospira.
malignant j. icterus gravis
mechanical j. obstructive j
neonatal j. icterus neonatorum
j. of the newborn icterus neonatorum
nonobstructive j. any j. in which the main biliary passages are not obstructed, e.g., hemolytic j. or j. due to hepatitis.
nuclear j. kernicterus
obstructive j. j. resulting from obstruction to the flow of bile into the duodenum, whether intra- or extrahepatic.mechanical j;
painless j. j. not associated with abdominal pain; usually used for obstructive j. resulting from obstruction of the common bile duct at the head of the pancreas by a tumor or impaction of a stone.
physiologic j. icterus neonatorum
postarsphenamine j. liver toxicity, causing j., in a patient who has received arsphenamine.
regurgitation j. j. due to biliary obstruction, the bile pigment having been conjugated and secreted by the hepatic cells and then reabsorbed into the bloodstream.
retention j. j. due to insufficiency of liver function or to an excess of bile pigment production; the bilirubin is unconjugated because it has not passed through the liver cells; van den Bergh test is indirect.
Schmorl's j. kernicterus.
spherocytic j. hemolytic j. associated with spherocytosis.
spirochetal j. j. caused by infection with Leptospira species, usually Leptospira icterohemorrhagica.
toxemic j. hemolytic j

 

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